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Farmington VFW baseball: Post 7662 knocked out of districts

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sports Farmington, 55024

Farmington Minnesota P.O. Box 192 / 312 Oak St. 55024

The Farmington VFW baseball team’s first back-to-back losses of the summer put an end to its season Friday night.

Post 7662 (17-7-1) won its first round game over Sleepy Eye before being dealt losses by Shakopee Red and Fairmont in its next two district tournament contests in Mankato.

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“It’s tough losing two in one day when we hadn’t lost two in a row all year, but it was a great season,” VFW coach Jon Graff said. “Of course we would have liked to keep going, but all in all we played some really good ball this summer and really showed we can compete with anyone. We got some really good pitching all year and really started to develop a good approach at the plate, so it’ll be neat to see how we continue to develop for next year.”

Justin King gave Farmington a strong start in last Thursday’s opening round, holding Sleepy Eye to one earned run and striking out eight in a 4-2 win.

King went all seven innings and held Sleepy Eye to five hits. He also picked off a base runner and got a couple key outs thanks to nice defensive plays by Sam Needham and Jacob Laube.

Dylan Bergstad, Luke Johnson and Hayden Kendall each drove in runs.

“Offensively we didn’t get a lot going, but it was enough,” Graff said. “We hit the ball hard, but it was right at them.”

A day later, Shakopee plated four runs in the bottom of the first and held Post 7662 to six hits in a 6-1 final.

Nick Bauer had two hits and Christian Groves drove home Farmington’s lone run.

Post 7662 rallied to take a 4-3 lead in the sixth against Fairmont, but allowed four runs in the bottom of the sixth and fell, 7-4.

Five Farmington errors led to six unearned runs against starter Cole Farthing.

Johnson and King each recorded two hits and Needham drove in a pair.

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