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Looking back: A reading room for men was suggested after Farmington went dry in 1914

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life Farmington, 55024
Farmington Minnesota P.O. Box 192 / 312 Oak St. 55024

50 years ago

From the May 7, 1964

edition of the

Dakota County Tribune

Farmor store hosts grand opening May 7, 8

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The Farmor Store under the management of Harold and Sandra Nelson of Farmington, invites the public to attend their grand opening on Thursday and Friday of this week, May 7 and 8.

The new business located at Town’s Edge Shopping Center, Farmington, will provide all general farm needs.

Valuable merchandise prizes will be awarded and free coffee and donuts will be served both days during the grand opening.

Man recovering after 1,800 lb. tank fell on him

Ed Kohman, 27, of Rt. 2, Farmington, sustained broken blood vessels in his right leg between the hip and knee when a hoist chain broke and caused an 1800-pound, 1,000-gallon LP gas tank to fall on him, Monday afternoon at Fischer’s gravel pit west of Rosemount.

He was resting comfortably with no broken bones in Sanford Hospital Monday evening.

Kohman, an employee of Natro-Gas, was helping pick up the tank when the hoist chain broke. Farmington ambulance took him to the hospital.

Local band receives “A”

The Farmington High School band received an “A” in the State-Region Contest at the U of Minn., Saturday, May 2.

Also receiving an “A” was Judy Graham playing a piccolo solo. She was accompanied by Kathleen Corrigan.

Those receiving a “B” were Steve Kindem, clarinet solo, accompanied by Kathleen Corrigan; Wendell Johnson, cornet solo, accompanied by Karen Johnson; Loretta Weisbrich, baritone solo, accompanied by Kathleen Corrigan; Judy Graham, flute solo, accompanied by Kathleen Corrigan; Wendell Johnson, Robert Stahnke, Duane Snesrud, Donald Thompson, cornet quartet.

Students attend “Youth County” program

High school students from Dakota County took a look at “Grass Roots” politics in the American Legion sponsored Boys and Girls County program held Monday.

The all-day affair included visits to various county offices and an explanation of their purpose.

Luverne Schaffer, American Legion county committee chairman, led the tour through the Hastings courthouse where the program was held.

About 50 high school students attended the program, among them were: Farmington – Kathleen Corrigan, Joan Church, Barbara Gilbertson, Susan Clark, Joel Stapf, Marvin Alexander, Wayne Dahmes and Roger Hill; Rosemount – Jim Davis, Sandy Swank, Curt Broderson and Kathy Fischer.

75 years ago

From the May 12, 1939

edition of the

Dakota County Tribune

Broken rail piles up nine cars

A broken rail caused nine northbound Rock Island freight cars to derail two miles south of Castle Rock at 3:00 Monday morning.

Five cars of soft coal went on a sit-down strike and four cars of grain piled up and dumped grain into a farmer’s pasture. About 100 yards of rails and road bed were torn up.

The pile-up occurred a quarter of a mile southwest of the Everett Boudeau farm dwelling.

Traffic, routed over the Great Western, resumed over the Milwaukee road at 5:00 p.m. Monday, Agent C.R. Anderson said.

Harris Romerein resigns Tuesday

The board of education Tuesday reluctantly accepted the resignation of Harris Romerein, Farmington high school principal the past eight years and teacher here for nine years.

After accepting Mr. Romerein’s resignation, the board appointed Harlowe Johnson the principal. His new duties will begin with the fall term. Mr. Johnson who has been a teacher in the local high school four years has been very highly recommended and his many friends wish him continued success.

Mr. Romerein took Julian Jacobson’s place as principal, continuing with music subjects, economic geography and social science. Two years ago, Miss Muriel Theurer was engaged to take the music subjects and Mr. Romerein devoted his entire time to the principalship, social science and educational guidance. He organized the band and the mixed chorus, both organizations being very prominent in the local school life.

100 years ago

From the May 8, 1914

edition of the

Dakota County Tribune

What will be done

Now that Farmington is dry and there are no saloons, where are the men who spent much of their spare time in these places going to “hang out?”...

If we take away objectionable amusement ought we not give something in its place?

We who have our comfortable homes to go to when our day’s work is over are apt to forget the fellow, who when his supper is over, finds time heavy on his hands.

If we want the employed men of our town to help us keep the town dry, let’s get busy and at least make them as comfortable as they were when the town was wet.

A reading room opened day times and evenings where the men can feel welcome and at home, and as much more as we can arrange for their comfort and amusement would fill a much felt want and make for the betterment of Farmington.

Money given away

F.C. Whittier, the movie show manager, is conducting a unique contest which ought to interest everyone. Everybody who buys a ticket to the movies is given a voting slip on which they may write the name of any church, lodge, club or society in which they may be interested, and at the end of 30 days the organization having received the largest number of votes will be paid one cent for all votes which have been deposited.

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