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Seniors: From country girl to city kid

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Farmington Independent
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Seniors: From country girl to city kid
Farmington Minnesota P.O. Box 192 / 312 Oak St. 55024

Jeannette Schauer grew up in the country, but the search for work turned her into a city girl pretty quickly.

Schauer was born to a farm family in Enderlin, North Dakota. The third of six children, she was a self-described daddy's girl who loved driving the horses and the tractors as the family worked the fields. She attended a country school where she had just four other students in her class.

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"I did a lot of farm work," Schauer said. "Mostly I liked to drive horses when we had horses, but my dad got into tractors."

When she was 11, Schauer's family moved 20 miles south to another farm near Lisbon, N.D. She finished school there, but when she was 17 her older sister moved to Minneapolis to work for Western Union. Since there was little in the way of employment around Lisbon, Schauer followed along. She worked at the boarding house where her sister lived, and she did other odd jobs.

It was a big adjustment from life on the farm, but Schauer enjoyed herself.

"As long as I had my sister there. She showed me," Schauer said.

Schauer worked for 15 years in receiving at Target before moving to Rosemount to work at Grist Mill.

Schauer met the man she would eventually marry at the Prom Ballroom in St. Paul. He was a farmer from Glencoe, and the pair hit it off. They were married in 1952. They later divorced, but they had three children together, two girls and a boy.

"They're wonderful kids," Schauer said.

From Rosemount, Schauer moved to Farmington's Spruce Place apartments for nine years. She stayed there until she fell in her kitchen and broke her ankle last year. These days, she lives at Trinity Care Center. She can't walk, so she gets around in a wheelchair.

Schauer keeps busy crocheting afghans. She'll make them for anyone who wants one, but there's a catch.

"If anybody wants an afghan they have to furnish the yarn, because I can't get out," she said.

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Nathan Hansen
Nathan Hansen has been a reporter and editor with the Farmington Independent and the Rosemount Town Pages since 1997. He is very tall.
(651) 460-6606
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